GLASS INSULATORS VALUE. INSULATORS VALUE


Glass Insulators Value

Glass insulators value. Canadian old coins value.

Glass Insulators Value

    glass insulators

  • An insulator, also called a dielectric, is a material that resists the flow of electric current. An insulating material has atoms with tightly bonded valence electrons.

glass insulators value

glass insulators value – The Definitive

The Definitive Guide to Colorful Insulators
The Definitive Guide to Colorful Insulators
Collecting insulators is synonymous with collecting history. Ever since the first telegraph line was constructed by Samuel Morse in 1844, glass, plastic, and other insulators have played an important part in our technological society. They have made it possible to carry telegraph, telephone, and electrical power lines over vast distances, connecting the nation and the world. This is the first book ever to graphically demonstrate the hundreds of beautiful colors to be found on insulators throughout the world. There are over seven hundred color photographs, each with a descriptive caption to guide both the beginner and advanced collector through a huge assortment of designs and manufacturers. Each photograph carries a current value for the item shown. No other book captures the beauty found within this colorful and historical hobby.

Desert-amethyst transmission and fluorescence

Desert-amethyst transmission and fluorescence
This is an old glass insulator taken from a collapsed telegraph pole in the Australian desert. Being subjected to intense UV light from the Sun over many years, ‘colour centres’ (defects) are created in the glass (containing iron and manganese) to produce the purple (amethyst-like) colour. For me, this is a highly-valued object and it was very hard to find one!

Manganese used to be added to the glass to counteract (decolourise) the green tint from the iron impurities. The colour centres can be destroyed by heating the glass to several hundred degrees C. In self-darkening spectacles however, the colour centres created by exposure to sunlight will remove themselves in the dark at room temperature.

This is a new version that inclures the fluorescence spectrum excited by a 404nm laser.

Desert-amethyst transmission

Desert-amethyst transmission
This is an old glass insulator taken from a collapsed telegraph pole in the Australian desert. Being subjected to intense UV light from the Sun over many years, ‘colour centres’ (defects) are created in the glass (containing iron and manganese) to produce the purple (amethyst-like) colour. For me, this is a highly-valued object and it was very hard to find one!
Manganese used to be added to the glass to counteract (decolourise) the green tint from the iron impurities. The colour centres can be destroyed by heating the glass to several hundred degrees C. In self-darkening spectacles however, the colour centres created by exposure to sunlight will remove themselves in the dark at room temperature.

glass insulators value

The Definitive Guide to Colorful Insulators
Collecting insulators is synonymous with collecting history. Ever since the first telegraph line was constructed by Samuel Morse in 1844, glass, plastic, and other insulators have played an important part in our technological society. They have made it possible to carry telegraph, telephone, and electrical power lines over vast distances, connecting the nation and the world. This is the first book ever to graphically demonstrate the hundreds of beautiful colors to be found on insulators throughout the world. There are over seven hundred color photographs, each with a descriptive caption to guide both the beginner and advanced collector through a huge assortment of designs and manufacturers. Each photograph carries a current value for the item shown. No other book captures the beauty found within this colorful and historical hobby.



Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: